EPA is GOOD For YOU: More muscle melting Medicine, AVOID IT- olgalazin@gmail.com - Gmail

Dear Readers:   MUSCLE STRENGTHS, KEEP IT UP!



Take more DPA every day, will help you keep your muscle volume strong:  I am quoting here Dr Al SEARS, reposting his daily blurbs worth reading:



More muscle melting malarkey - olgalazin@gmail.com - Gmail: "ow, Big Pharma’s labs have invented another way to melt muscle. Statin drugs. One called Cerivastatin (Baycor) was pulled from the market after numerous reports of rhabdomyolysis.

Statin users already suffer from fatigue, muscle cramping, and weakness. Almost ten percent of statin users report these symptoms. I bet the number who suffer them in silence is even higher.

But rhabdomyolysis is a lot worse.

Researchers out of the University of Alabama zeroed in on statins’ effect. They looked at a class of muscle cells called satellite cells.3 These are responsible for cell division and growth.

Normally, if you strain a muscle, they kick into gear, repairing and replacing damaged tissue.

But the most popular statin drugs slow down the restorative action of satellite cells by 50%. This is especially dangerous for your skeletal muscles, since satellite cells are active guardians and healers when it comes to ligaments and tendons.

The fact is your doctor shouldn’t be focusing on cholesterol levels anyway. It’s the great red herring of modern medicine. Seventy-five percent of heart attack sufferers have perfectly normal cholesterol levels.

Although a number of drug trials have been conducted, none of them have been able to support the cholesterol-heart disease connection, either.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute conducted the Lipid Research Clinics Coronary Primary Prevention Trial to test the effectiveness of cholestryramine, a drug thought to lower cholesterol.

Seven years later, researchers analyzed the data and found that the cholesterol levels decreased by 8 percent, but there were no statistically significant differences in heart attack rates.4

A “meta-study” came along and took a wrecking ball to the cholesterol myth. Published in the internationally prestigious Quarterly Journal of Medicine, it extensively surveyed results from decades of research on heart disease involving hundreds of thousands of individuals.

The conclusion? Absolutely no correlation exists between cholesterol and heart attack risk.5

Bottom line: steer clear of statins.

Instead of worrying about cholesterol, if you want to avoid heart disease and heart attacks, lower inflammation instead. It’s the real culprit for poor heart health.

Inflammation of the tissue that lines your arteries (the “endothelium”) is the main cause of atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries.

Endothelial damage leads to the build-up of arterial plaque—a substance made up of bad stuff that gets trapped in damaged tissue. This includes triglycerides, waste from cellular metabolism, and calcium.

One of the best ways I know of to beat inflammation and never worry about heart disease again is EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid).

This essential fatty acid reduces inflammation and plaque build-up in your arteries, both of which are primary causes for chronic disease.

In fact, a new study from the Nippon Medical School looked at 139 people who already had heart failure and high inflammation. EPA is so good at lowering inflammation and healing the heart that simply having enough EPA lowers the risk of having any cardiac event by 79%.6

Show me a drug that does that.

EPA is from the family of healthy fats that you can’t make, so you must take in to keep inflammation low, maintain your heart rhythm, and raise HDL, the protective kind of cholesterol.

Nature gave us the two best sources of EPA, meat and fish. For thousands of years this worked perfectly. Until modern food production practices stripped EPA from our food.

Meat and fish are now farmed … and raised on an unnatural diet. As a consequence, they have little EPA.



I recommend only grass-fed, pasture-raised meat because it has a higher concentration of EPA, just like nature intended. I would also stay away from farmed fish like tilapia. Try wild, cold-water, high-fat fish like pollock, salmon, lake trout and herring.

Some people don’t like fish, and if you’re one of them, try krill oil. It’s more absorbable than fish oil, and will not turn rancid. It’s more absorbable because the EPA is in “phospholipid” form which penetrates directly into the cells of the heart and brain. This form is worth the little extra you’ll pay for it.

There are no direct plant sources of EPA. Your body must convert the ALA from plant foods like walnuts, Brazil nuts, almonds and pumpkin seeds into EPA.

Try to get at least 500 mg of EPA per day.

To Your Good Health,

Al Sears, MD

1. Archives of General Psychiatry, 2007.
2. Shekelle P, et. al. “Efficacy and Comparative Effectiveness of Off-Label Use of Atypical Antipsychotics.” Comparative Effectiveness Reviews, No. 6. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. January 2007.
3. Thalacker-Mercer et al. “Simvastatin Reduces Human Primary Satellite Cell Proliferation in Culture.” University of Alabama at Birmingham. For presentation at the American Physiological Society Conference The Integrative Biology of Exercise V. Hilton Head, SC. September 24-27, 2008.
4. The Lipid Research Clinic’s coronary primary prevention trial results 1. Reduction in incidence of coronary heart disease. Journal of the American Medical Association 251, 351-64, 1984.
5. Ravnskov, U. “High cholesterol may protect against infections and atherosclerosis.” Quarterly Journal of Medicine. 2003. 96:927-34.
6. Kohashi K, et. al. "Effects of Eicosapentaenoic Acid on the Levels of Inflammatory Markers, Cardiac Function and Long-Term Prognosis in Chronic Heart Failure Patients with Dyslipidemia." J Atheroscler Thromb. 2014. Epub ahead of print."


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