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Director of Development, Research Programs Job at RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, CA | LinkedIn

Director of Development, Research Programs Job at RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, CA | LinkedIn:



Programs Share to social media Santa Monica, CAPosted 11 days ago175 viewsBe one of the first 10 applicants.

WRITING SAMPLE GUIDELINES for RAND Careers

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Writing Sample GuidelinesResearch publications or other similar writing samples are required for all research and analysis jobs. Excellent analytical skills and the ability to communicate clearly and effectively are necessary for all levels of employment in RAND research, and your writing sample is important in the evaluation of your application. Electronic, Unclassified Samples Preferred The writing sample should generally be in the range of 10-15 pages in published form, or 20-30 pages in manuscript form, and should be one of the following: A journal article for which you are the sole author or first author, published in a refereed sourceA chapter in a longer reportA chapter or other selection (20-30 pages) from a thesis or dissertation, accompanied by the table of contentsFor Research Assistant applicants only, one upper division research paper or a chapter from a senior thesisNewspaper articles are not appropriate writing samples. One writing sample is sufficient if it is a published …

Rand Corporation Position in Health Research - Careers

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Careers:

Title Mid- or Senior-Level Health Researcher / Schaeffer Fellow Overview of RAND The RAND Corporation is a research organization that develops solutions to public policy challenges to help make communities throughout the world safer and more secure, healthier and more prosperous. RAND’s research and analysis address issues that impact people everywhere, including security, health, education, sustainability, growth, and development. Headquartered in Santa Monica, California, RAND has approximately 1,700 people from more than 45 countries working in offices in North America, Europe and Australia, with annual revenues of more than $260 million.

RAND is nonprofit, nonpartisan, and committed to the public interest.  Our research is sponsored by government agencies, foundations, other nonprofit organizations, and the private sector. We rely on philanthropic support to reach beyond the scope of client-sponsored work to tackle questions that may be too big, too complex, or too new for o…

Word Fact: What Is the Difference Between “Discreet” and “Discrete”? |Word of the Day; flivver Dictionary.com Blog

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Word Fact: What Is the Difference Between “Discreet” and “Discrete”? | Dictionary.com Blog:

Word Fact: What Is the Difference Between “Discreet” and “Discrete”?September 4, 2014by: Dictionary.com427 Comments This is another pair of homophones (words that sound alike but are different in meaning, spelling, or both) that can be very confusing. Discreet implies the showing of reserve and prudence in one’s behavior or speech. Discrete means something quite different: “distinct, separate, unrelated.” Both words derive from the same Latin word discretus meaning “separated.” Until the 1700s, these words were each spelled many different ways including discretediscreetdyscretediscreete, etc. Eventually discrete and discreet came to be differentiated in spelling as well as in meaning. Discreet has yielded the noun discretion, but discrete‘s noun form is discreteness. For most of English history, discreet was more frequently used, but today discrete is much more frequently used than discreet;…

Word Fact: What Is the Difference Between “Discreet” and “Discrete”? |Word of the Day; flivver Dictionary.com Blog

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Word Fact: What Is the Difference Between “Discreet” and “Discrete”? | Dictionary.com Blog:

Word Fact: What Is the Difference Between “Discreet” and “Discrete”?September 4, 2014by: Dictionary.com427 Comments This is another pair of homophones (words that sound alike but are different in meaning, spelling, or both) that can be very confusing. Discreet implies the showing of reserve and prudence in one’s behavior or speech. Discrete means something quite different: “distinct, separate, unrelated.” Both words derive from the same Latin word discretus meaning “separated.” Until the 1700s, these words were each spelled many different ways including discretediscreetdyscretediscreete, etc. Eventually discrete and discreet came to be differentiated in spelling as well as in meaning. Discreet has yielded the noun discretion, but discrete‘s noun form is discreteness. For most of English history, discreet was more frequently used, but today discrete is much more frequently used than discreet;…