CYSTITIS & INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS, Urination Problems | Search by Symptom

CYSTITIS & INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS: Urination Problems | Search by Symptom:



frequent urination, trouble urinating, dribbling after urination



*7. Do you have the urge to urinate after just using the restroom, and are you only urinating small amounts at a time?
Yes
Your symptoms may be caused by an infection in the bladder, calledCYSTITIS, or from an irritation of the bladder, calledINTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS, or from a KIDNEY STONEstuck in the bladder, or a chemical in the urine.See your doctor.
b. 
***10. Are you a woman, and do you leak urine when you cough or sneeze?



URGENCY INCONTINENCE CIND LEAKING PEE BEFORE GETTING TO THE BATHROOM; vezi MERCOLA:

***10. Are you a woman, and do you leak urine when you cough or sneeze?
Yes
Your symptoms may be from a weakness in the bladder due to childbirth or aging. This weakness causes STRESS INCONTINENCE.Absorbent protection may be helpful. Kegel exercises may help strengthen muscles that support the bladder. See your doctor.

Yes










Your symptoms may be from a weakness in the bladder due to childbirth or aging. This weakness causes 








Absorbent protection may be helpful. Kegel exercises may help strengthen muscles that support the bladder. See your doctor.

NOW MERCOLA: 


'via Blog this'

6 Natural Methods for Treating Urinary Symptoms

If you're struggling with urinary symptoms that are interfering with your life, the following methods can be very effective:
  1. Do Kegels: More women than men might be familiar with this term. A Kegel squeeze is performed by drawing your lower pelvic muscles up and holding them up high and tight. For men who aren't familiar with that term, it's similar to trying to stop urinating in the middle of the flow. This can help to strengthen the muscles that help you hold in and control the flow of urine. Kegels can also help you suppress the need to urinate if you have trouble with frequency.
  2. Keep a Bladder Diary: This will help you become familiar with your bathroom habits so you can identify a pattern. It may help you develop a plan to visit the bathroom at timed intervals to avoid accidents, as well as help you strategically increase time between bathroom trips as you gain control.
  3. Bladder Training: The bladder diary is often one step of bladder training, which involves visiting the restroom according to a fixed schedule. When you feel the need to urinate before a scheduled visit, practice Kegels or relaxation exercises like deep breathing to suppress the urge.
  4. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment or Chiropractic Adjustments: Research has shown that osteopathic manipulative treatment provided virtually the same therapeutic effect as pelvic floor muscle training (Kegels) in women with lower urinary tract disorders.6
  5. Limiting Fluids at Certain Times of the Day: If you're getting up during the night to urinate, stop drinking three to four hours before bedtime. Coffee, tea, and alcohol should also be restricted.
  6. Enlarged Prostate: Men, if you believe an enlarged prostate is causing your urinary symptoms, read these tips for maintaining a healthy prostate.
If you only experience occasional incontinence, wearing a thin absorbent pad may help give you confidence and allow you to go about with your daily schedule without fears of embarrassment. But, ideally, try the safe options above so that you can fully recover. Remember, this is a very common problem that can often be effectively treated, naturally. As the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC) put it: 7
"…many women are afraid to mention their problem. They may have urinary incontinence that can improve with treatment but remain silent sufferers and resort to wearing absorbent undergarments, or diapers. This practice is unfortunate, because diapering can lead to diminished self-esteem, as well as skin irritation and sores. If you are relying on diapers to manage your incontinence, you and your family should discuss with your doctor the possible effectiveness of treatments such as timed voiding and pelvic muscle exercises."
  • Urogynecologist. This is an obstetrician-gynecologist with additional training in problems that affect a woman's pelvic floor — the network of muscles, ligaments, connective tissue and nerves that helps support and control the bladder and other pelvic organs.

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